Low Carb Naan Bread!

Two pieces is only 3 net carbs!

Ingredients

Garlic butter

  • 3½ oz. butter
  • 1 – 2 garlic cloves, minced

Instructions

  1. Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl. Add oil and then boiling water and stir thoroughly.
  2. Allow to rise for five minutes. The dough will turn firm fairly quickly, but stay flexible. It should resemble the consistency of Play-Doh. If you find it’s too runny then add more psyllium husk until it feels right. The amount needed may vary depending on what brand of husk or coconut flour you use.
  3. Divide into 6 or 8 pieces and form into balls that you flatten with your hands directly on parchment paper or on the kitchen counter.
  4. Fry rounds in coconut oil over medium heat until the Naan turn a nice golden color.
  5. Heat the oven to 140°F (70°C) and keep the bread warm while you make more.
  6. Melt the butter and stir in the freshly squeezed garlic. Apply the melted butter on the bread pieces using a brush and sprinkle flaked salt on top.
  7. Pour the rest of the garlic butter in a bowl and dip pieces of bread in it.

Recipe taken from The Diet doctor: https://www.dietdoctor.com/recipes/low-carb

Raspberry Mousse Cake…yummy!

Raspberry Mousse Cake With Only 5 Net Carbs Per Serving!
Course: Cake, Dessert
Servings: 8 Slices
Author: Angela Coleby
Ingredients
Sponge
  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 6 eggs separated
  • 1/2 cup erythritol or sugar substitute
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
Raspberry Mousse
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup cream heavy/whipping
  • 340 g raspberries
  • 1 pack gelatin
  • 1/4 cup water
Instructions
To make the cake:
  1. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F degrees.

  2. Grease and line two sponge tins (I used an 8 inch spring form tin twice)

  3. Whisk the egg whites until stiff peaks form.

  4. Beat the egg yolks with the erythritol.

  5. Add the vanilla extract, ginger baking powder and coconut flour. Whisk until combined.

  6. Gently fold in the egg whites.

  7. Pour into the cake tins and bake for 15 minutes until golden and firm.

  8. Set aside to cool.

To make the mousse
  1. Heat up the water, add the gelatin (or agar agar) and stir until combined.

  2. Blend the raspberries until smooth and add to the gelatin mixture.

  3. Beat the eggs with the erythritol. Add the raspberry mixture and stir well.

  4. Whip the cream into stiff peaks.

  5. Fold the cream into the raspberry mixture and stir well.

To assemble the cake
  1. Place one sponge in the bottom of the spring form cake tin.

  2. Pour the mousse on top and spread out evenly.

  3. Place the other sponge on top of the mousse gently.

  4. Put into the fridge for at least 4 hours, allowing the mousse to set.

  5. Remove the cake from the spring form tin.

  6. Slice, eat and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Makes 8 Slices

Nutritional Info per slice – 175 Calories, 12g Fat, 9g Protein, 10g Total Carbs, 5g Fibre, 5g Net Carbs

Very Low Calorie Diets Do Not Work In The Long Run

Have you heard of the new hCG diet?  The hormone hCG is actually the hormone that the body makes during pregnancy.  The hCG diet is an extremely low calorie diet (500 calories per day for 8 weeks) while taking hCG, either by getting a shot or by taking a homeopathic product, such as oral drops, pellets, or sprays, which you can buy at health food stores.   The Bernstein diet is also a very low calorie diet (700-900 calories per day) and they give you B-12 injections.  There are tons of diets that supply less than 1000 calories per day but are they good for you?

I am not personally a fan of very low calorie diets (VLCD) as I don’t believe that eating so little calories is successful in the long run.  Statistics show that people who follow a very low calorie diet put their weight back on quickly because they go back to eating more calories once (if) they achieve their weight loss goals, and once you start eating more calories, the body wants to store the extra calories simply because it needs it for daily body functions and doesn’t know if you are going to starve yourself again.   The body is quite brilliant and resourceful.

We all have what’s called a basal metabolic rate (BMR).  The BMR is the amount of calories the body burns AT REST just to operate our bodies.  This would include respiration, digestion, elimination etc.  My BMR is 2,200 calories due to my weight, amount of muscle and water is in my body.  If I eat only 800 calories (or less) then my body is in a deficit of 1,400 calories.  This deficit will greatly upset my body as it needs energy to function.  This is actually very dangerous to your body because you will not get all the nutrients that you need thus having nutritional deficiencies which will cause a plethora of other health issues.

Look at the “fight or flight” response.  When you are facing a life threatening situation you can either run or you can fight.  When this happens, some factors come to play.  Your pupils dilate (so you can see better), the blood is shunted to your muscles (so you can run) AND your body stores fat because it simply doesn’t know how long you are going to run or fight for.  This is an automatic response of the body, which is also why it is difficult for you to lose weight if you are stressed (physically or emotionally).

The same thing happens when you ‘starve’ yourself.  Your body will store fat the minute you start eating again because it is simply trying to protect itself for the future.  It’s quite amazing really and at the same time, quite frustrating.

Bottom line…don’t starve yourself.  It’s not healthy and you will most likely put your weight back on at some point.  It’s simply not feasible to eat less than 1000 calories every day forever.  Be realistic.  Make healthier lifestyle changes including following a healthy low carb diet and walking or some exercise.  I wish I had that magic weight loss pill but if I did, I would be somewhere in the Caribbean drinking Mai Tai’s on the beach…

 

 

Have you heard of the “Fat Set Point’?

The body weight set point theory is simple: it suggests that the body uses hormones, hunger, behavior changes, and other physiological mechanisms to “defend” a certain range of body weight (and body fat in particular).  A simple way to think of this is as a “thermostat” or “cruise control” system for body weight and fat levels. Whatever numbers are set are what your body strives to maintain.  But is this true?

The human body is able to adapt to situations of excess or insufficient energy intake (food). Several studies have shown that not only eating habits, but also genetics determine adult body size. For adults who do not consciously try to control their body size, weight is remarkably stable over time. These three factors together have led to the description of a “set point” – a reference point around which the body tries to keep a weight stable. An example of another set point is body temperature – if temperatures go above or below 37ºC (for example, from infection or exposure to a cold environment) there are a variety of physical mechanisms that “kick in” to try to get back to, and
maintain normal body temperature.

Each individual may have a genetically determined set point for adult weight. If weight is gained it has been shown that some people experience an increase in metabolism so that excess energy is wasted. Following this period of weight gain, it is relatively easy to revert to the previous set point weight. However, trying to go below the set point weight has the opposite affect. Metabolism can slow down as less food is eaten or exercise is increased. This leads to a slow down in weight loss, a plateau, or even weight regain on few calories. This is your body’s attempt to keep your weight stable.

These mechanisms have been used to explain why few people are able to maintain any weight loss following a reducing diet. Those who do maintain a lower weight were probably above their set point when they started the diet. They lost weight down to their set point and were able to maintain at their set point without constant restriction. However, for those already at their set-point, but above “average” weight, a reducing diet attempts to get them below set-point, resulting in slower metabolism and quick regain on few calories, as the body attempts to keep the physically “normal”, but culturally “high” weight. Your set point, unlike your brain, does not care about current fashion. You may say that a weight of 175 lbs is too high for how you would like to look, higher than the height/weight tables tell you to be and, indeed, higher than your family doctor tells you to be. However, it may be exactly what your genes are telling you to be. This creates a real conflict.

One frustration with the concept of set point is that there is no direct way to measure it. You cannot say that your set point is 150 lbs. You can only estimate that you are at set point if you have been eating “normally” and participating in moderate exercise for about a year. It is estimated that it takes that long, free of dieting, to allow your metabolism and weight to return to what is normal for you. Of course, this applies to adults. The concept cannot be applied before growth has stopped. One other observation to make is to look at your family of origin. What size were your parents, their siblings or their parents? Predisposition to be a certain size “runs in the family”.

There is controversy about what alters set point. Pregnancy, for example, increases the amount of body fat as well as weight. It is an area of research interest, looking at why a group of women revert immediately to their pre-pregnancy weight, and other women never do. Some researchers say that factors such as repeated dieting or certain drugs permanently elevate the set point, meaning that you will likely stay at this new higher “natural” weight. Others say that you are “artificially above set point” and will revert to your “natural” weight in time. At present, there are more questions than answers.

So what does this mean? Does this mean you can never be thin? Does it mean that you can eat whatever you want and never gain weight? You can lose weight; you can gain weight. However, the implication of the set-point concept is that the farther you get from your set-point, the more difficult it is to continue, and your body will try to revert to your “natural” weight. Allowing your weight to remain stable, at your own set point, is healthier than the diet-regain cycle.

It means that you should consider weight as you consider height. Just as people have the genetic background to be short, average or tall, they have the genetic predisposition to be thin, average or large.

To summarize, there is good news and bad news. The good news is that you do not have to keep beating yourself for being “weak-willed” or “lazy” as reasons for your inability to maintain weight loss. The bad news is that we are living in a culture which highly values thinness in women. We need to learn to accept ourselves and others at whatever they natural weight and to challenge the notion that thin people are necessarily happier, smarter and have more fun.

Resource: Donna Ciliska, R.N., Ph.D

 

Yo-Yo Diets…Are They That Bad?

It is a well know fact that most of us who are successful at losing weight, at some point put it back on again, and then some.  Then, we lose the weight again and put it on again and again and again.  We all know this is yo-yo dieting but how does this affect me and my efforts to keep the weight off?  The answer is simple…every time you lose weight and then put it on again, you may be the same weight as when you started but you are a little “fatter”.

  • Let’s say you weigh 200 lbs and you lose 50 pounds.  The 50 lbs lost is NOT ALL FAT.  Some is water, muscle etc.  So let’s say 40 lbs of that weight loss is fat, 5 lbs was muscle (usually because you don’t eat enough if you are following a low calorie diet)and 5 lbs was water.
  • Now, you gain back 50 lbs.  BUT you gain 50 lbs of fat.  You don’t gain muscle back unless you work out.  So you are actually an additional 10 lbs “fatter” even though you are still back to 200 lbs.
  • The more times you do this the fatter you get.  This is why people often say “I used to be able to lose weight fairly easily and now it is so much harder”.  You multiply the number of fat cells AND you make your fat cells fatter.

So how can I avoid this?  Stop dieting!!!  Diets don’t work!  Now, don’t get me wrong.  You should know by now I am an advocate of following a very low carb lifestyle, but the key word here is LIFESTYLE.  It is your way of life.  It is being aware of how many carbs you are eating and make alternate choices that are lower carb version.  It’s using lettuce for a hamburger bun or making the low carb/gluten free almond buns that I have posted earlier.  I have made these buns so many times and it literally takes me 5 minutes to make and 20-30 minutes to bake.  I will actually bring one of these buns if I am going to a restaurant and want a hamburger.  I tell my waitress that I am gluten intolerant but luckily I have my own bun :-).

If you are new to my blog, scroll down to find the RULES to following a low carb lifestyle if you want to lose weight or if you want to maintain your weight and just stay healthy.  I promise you will lose all of your sugar cravings and you will feel so much more energy.  Isn’t that worth it?

Cheese and Herb Biscuits

Cheese & herb biscuits (naturally from Angela on divaliciousrecipes.com)
Only 1.2 Net carbs per biscuit and gluten free!

Yields 24
Ingredients
  • ½ cup (113g) butter, room temperature
  • 1 ½ cup (170g) Cheddar Cheese, grated
  • ½ cup (50g) Parmesan Cheese, grated
  • 1 ½ (150g) cup ground almonds/almond flour
  • ¼ cup (28g) coconut flour
  • 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary
  • 2 tablespoons chopped chives
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon white pepper
Instructions
* Mix the butter and cheeses together.
* Add the coconut and almond flour and work into a dough.
* Add the herbs and seasoning and mix well into the dough.
* Cover and place in the fridge for 30 minutes to firm up
* Preheat the oven to 180C/350F degrees.
* Roll out the dough between two layers of parchment paper.
* Cut out shapes using a cookie cutter.
* Place the cookies on a parchment lined baking tray.
* Bake for 12-15 minutes until golden and firm.
* Eat and enjoy!
Notes
  • Makes 24 biscuits (using a star cookie cutter)
  • Nutritional Info per biscuit – 114 Calories, 10g Fat, 4g Protein, 2.5g Total Carbs, 1.3g Fibre, 1.2g Net Carbs
divalicious recipes http://divaliciousrecipes.com/

Appetite Control and Leptin

Appetite Control and Leptin

Leptin, the “satiety hormone”, discovered in just 1994 is a hormone made by fat cells that helps to regulate hunger.  After you eat, leptin is released into the bloodstream where it travels to the brain telling you to stop eating because you’re full.  Without leptin we could continue to eat until we explode.  Some people have what’s called leptin resistance where the brain is unable to pick up its signals causing mindless eating and overeating.  It’s also a cycle where the more you eat, the more engorged your fat cells, and the greater the risk of worsening your leptin resistance because it is your fat cells that make this hormone.  The more you gain, the more sensitive your body becomes to leptin.  Leptin resistance is associated with certain other medical conditions, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, thyroid issues, and elevated triglycerides in the bloodstream.  Leptin’s main role is long-term regulation of energy balance… the amount of calories we eat and expend, and how much fat we store on our bodies

People with leptin resistance may find that they have frequent or even constant cravings or feelings of hunger. Researchers are still working to fully understand and develop effective treatments for leptin resistance, but for now, controlling cravings is the key to combating the effects of this condition.  If you’re eating lots of sugar/carbs, or if you’re very stressed or sleep deprived, you’re more likely to feel like you have an appetite you just can’t satisfy. To beat your cravings, protein and fiber are the keys as they both keep you very full for a long time.

Reversing Leptin Resistance:  How do you know if you’re leptin resistant?  There is no set blood test done to determine leptin levels. The best test to do to determine if you are leptin resistant is to look in the mirror.  If you have a lot of body fat, especially in the belly area then you are almost certainly leptin resistant.  Leptin resistance occurs years before insulin resistance and full blown diabetes.

So what can we do?  The low carb, gluten free diet will help you tremendously!

  • Cut out grains, refined sugars and processed foods and replace them with “slow burn” foods like protein and fats so you avoid leptin spikes that cause leptin resistance
  • Increase the good fats in your diet including avocados, coconut oil, MCT oil, fish oils, butter, ghee and olive oil. Take 2,000mg-3,000mg Omega 3 (fish oils)
  • Avoid processed foods
  • Increase fiber in your diet. I recommend taking fiber supplements 30 minutes before each meal
  • Always have protein with each meal
  • Eat 3 meals per day and not snacking all day stabilizes leptin levels and avoids spikes
  • Exercise like resistance training increases leptin sensitivity so the signals can reach your brain that you’re full
  • Reduce your stress levels and get plenty of sleep

So here is yet another reason to follow a low carb, gluten free lifestyle.  Eating real low carb/sugar food, exercising and sleeping well are all lifelong endeavours that require a shift in lifestyle.