How Do You Define Low Carb and Keto

According to The Diet Doctor, they define the different levels of carbs this way:

  1. Keto Low Carb: Less than 20 grams of (net) carbs per day. This level will keep you in ketosis for most people if protein level remains moderate, not high.  In their keto recipes, less than 4% of their total energy is coming from carbs and the rest will come from protein and fat.  Note: It is important to keep the protein levels moderate as excess protein can be converted to glucose in your body.
  2. Moderate Low Carb: Between 20-50 grams of (net) carbs per day.  In their moderate low carb recipes, 4%-10% come from carbs and the rest will come from protein and fat.
  3. Liberal Low Carb: Between 50-100 grams of (net) carbs per day.  In their liberal low carb recipes, 10%-20% come from carbs and the rest will come from protein and fat.

Do you remember what NET carbs mean?  Fiber and sugar alcohols such as xylitol, maltitol or sorbital are not digestible carbs.  In other words, they cannot be absorbed by the body and have no glycemic effect so you can subtract them from the total carbs.  Ie: 20g total carbs, 12g fiber and 4g sugar alcohols would equal 4 NET carbs (20-12-4 = 4)

I strongly recommend that you purchase ketone stix and test the amount of ketones you are burning.  Sometimes we don’t think we are eating too many carbs so if you check your ketones and you are not testing positive, you are eating too many carbs as your body is not burning fat for energy (thus no ketones), instead it is burning glucose from the carbs.

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